Wednesday, 10 October 2012

7 ways to improve your CV


Your skills and experience

1 – Echo the language used in the job advertisement. Remember, the aim is to let the company know how well suited you are to the position you’re applying for. By using the same language, you’ll highlight the attributes that the employer is seeking – provoking a positive response.

2 – You might have one CV that shows you’re a great all-rounder, but your early experience as a retail assistant won’t be of much use in a managerial role in a different field. That said, you shouldn’t remove a job if it will leave a lengthy gap in your CV. Instead, focus on which responsibilities provided you with valuable but – most importantly – transferrable skills.

3 – Learn a language. So you’ve made all the abilities you already have sound the best they can, but why stop there? One of the most attractive new skills you can acquire is a language, and schools such as www.uiclondon.com make it easy.

Why not take one of their Spanish classes for adults in London? Knowing the world’s second most widely spoken language is sure to separate you from a similar, non-bilingual candidate.

Your personal details

4 – Only include one phone number. Your employer shouldn’t have to guess which to contact you on, and if you use a home phone number, make sure your answer machine message sounds professional – your ‘witty’ words could give the wrong impression.

5 – Look at your email address. If your account is an AOL one, it’ll make your entire CV seem dated – something you definitely do not want considering the importance of the web today! Avoid using a nickname or numbers – they’re distracting, leave more room for typing errors and will leave an employer wondering why they are significant (even if they aren’t).

Presentation is key

Design and formatting

6 – Ever been sent an advert with masses upon masses of text? Then you’ll know how unappealing it looks. Use bullet points to break up lengthy job descriptions into a clear, concise list of responsibilities that enabled you to use your expertise.

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it

7 – Use powerful verbs wherever possible and make sure you’re the subject of each point you make. For example, “responsibilities included writing copy for company newsletters” could be changed to the more effective “wrote all copy for company newsletters.”



Resource box
Creative CVs More ways to use design to stand out from the crowd

Formatting Tips and Tricks Advice on which fonts to pick and other formatting guidelines

Example CVs Want to see how it’s done? Here are a few templates for you to look at

No comments:

Post a Comment